NY State Senate Holds Hearing on Ban on Driver Use of Portable Electronic Devices

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In response to last December’s call by the National Transportation and Safety Board (NTSB) for a nationwide ban on driver use of portable electronic devices, the New York State Senate is holding hearings on distracted driving.National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) for a nationwide ban on driver use of portable electronic devices, the New York State Senate is holding hearings on distracted driving.

Testifying at the New York State Senate hearing is NTSB Vice-Chairman Christopher Hart, State Police Superintendent Joseph D’Amico, New York State Commissioner of Motor Vehicles Barbara Fiala, and representatives of AAA, Auto Alliance and Toyota.

 According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, over 5,400 people were killed and an estimated 448,000 were injured nationwide in crashes involving distracted driving in 2009.  It was statistics such as this which led the NTSB to urge all 50 states and the District of Columbia “to ban the non-emergency use of portable electronic devices (other than those designed to support the driving task).”

The first accident caused by distracted driving that was investigated by the NTSB was in 2002.  An automobile driven by a woman who was talking on her cell phone crashed, killing five people.

Here is a brief of list of other tragedies that led to today’s New York Senate Hearing as well as the NTSB’s call for a nationwide ban on driver use of portable electronic devices:

  • A bus accident in 2004 where 11 high school students were injured.
  • A 2008 collision of a commuter train with a freight train in California where 25 people died and dozens were injured.
  • A boating accident in 2010 where two tourists were killed.

New York Vehicle and Traffic Law sections 1225-c and 1225-d prohibit the use of hand-held mobile telephones and portable electronic devices (texting).  Conviction for violating New York’s cell phone law carries a fine of $150 and 3 points on your driving record.

For a free consultation about experienced and vigorous defense of your New York cell phone ticket or any other traffic violation, call 1-888-883-5529, or send us an e-mail to tell us about your case.

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This post was written by Adam Rosenblum


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